For Those Who Lost Their Employer Funded Health Insurance; Resources Are Available

Provided at no charge by the Houston Healthcare Initiative.  

For Those Who Lost Their Employer Funded Health Insurance Resources Are Available

Because of the Coronavirus/Covid-19 pandemic, 25–43 million people could lose their jobs and their health insurance. People who had a serious illness before the outbreak and job loss could be dealt a literally fatal blow. Others who had symptoms and even serious accidents while unemployed and without insurance could suffer more than they would have if their insurance were in place. But there are resources available as described this week on the Houston Healthcare Initiative podcast. To learn more, go to www.houstonhealthcareinitiative.org. To hear about this on Dr. Goldstein’s podcast, please visit: Job Losses Equal Employer Funded Health Insurance Loss.

  • Testing for the Coronavirus/Covid-19 illness: testing for the Coronavirus/Covid-19 virus is free. But if the test is positive and you have the virus, the treatment for it can get expensive. Fortunately, most people recover at home. However, an estimated 15% of infected people may end up hospitalized, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Recent data suggests that patients who go to intensive care stay there for an average of 20 days. The Castlight Covid-19 test site finder will provide information on Coronavirus testing near you: https://my.castlighthealth.com/corona-virus-testing-sites/.
  • The Health Insurance Exchange: Open enrollment typically runs from November to January, depending on the state in which you live. But people are allowed a change in coverage when experiencing a life altering event. One such event is the loss of a job and employer sponsored health insurance. You can shop for health plans through your state’s insurance marketplace. But don’t wait around, there are 30 to 60 days to sign up after a qualifying life event before the end of that special enrollment period. Go to this link and find out if you qualify for coverage: https://www.healthcare.gov.
  • Medicaid: Medicaid provides health coverage for some low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities in all fifty states.  In some states the program covers all low-income adults below a certain income level. But do not assume that you do or do not qualify. There are online resources available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services along with state references to guide you. Visit the official U.S. government Medicaid site to see of you are eligible: https://www.medicaid.gov.
  • CHIP: CHIP stands for Children’s Health Insurance Program. If your children need health coverage, they may be eligible for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP provides low-cost health coverage to children in families that earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid. In some states, CHIP covers pregnant women. Each state offers CHIP coverage and works closely with its state Medicaid program. Get all the details, go to: https://www.healthcare.gov/medicaid-chip/childrens-health-insurance-program/.
  • Faith Based Cooperatives: Faith-based plans are designed to provide essential coverage for the good health and physical well-being of their members. In return they expect members to live faith-based lives in adherence to the principles behind such plans. As such, faith-based plans will not cover hospital costs that stem from activities they deem immoral or unessential. Faith based plans most often share expenses among members. Each member pays a monthly premium. When one of the members becomes ill or needs treatment for an injury, his or her contributions cover the expenses, in conjunction with the collective input of fellow members. As such, the premiums are lower in comparison to those of traditional health care. These operate with exemptions to the mandates of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obama Care. There are several options. Here are a few:Medi-Share, Liberty HealthShare, Samaritan MinistriesOneShare, Christian Healthcare Ministries.

This is not an exhaustive list for those who lost their employer funded health insurance but is some go the most popular ones that are available.

About Houston Healthcare Initiative And Dr. Steven Goldstein

Dr. Steven Goldstein is a Houston based neurologist. He founded the Houston Healthcare Initiative and is an advocate for common sense solutions to the healthcare crisis that confronts the citizens and residents of the United States of America.

The Healthcare Not Received During the Coronavirus/Covid-19 Pandemic

From Heart Attacks to Cancer Screenings and Chemotherapy

During the Coronavirus/Covid-19 pandemic, people who did not have symptoms of the disease put themselves at risk as those with chronic conditions missed treatments, skipped appointments and chose not to report serious symptoms; this is the healthcare not received during the coronavirus/covid-19 pandemic. Many who lost their employer funded health insurance also missed schedules and treatments. Add to this the fear of visiting a doctor’s office or clinic with reported cases of Coronavirus/Covid-19 on the uptick, another health crisis may be on the horizon.

This was one of the issues affecting the American public discussed by Houston based neurologist Dr. Steven Goldstein on his regular podcast. The Houston Healthcare Initiative podcast can be heard on: Soundcloud, iHeart, Spotify, or iTunes. To learn more about the Houston Healthcare Initiative, go to www.houstonhealthcareinitiative.org.

Cancer Screenings Plummet

No Visitors
Patients who may need to be seen in the office are choosing not to go to the doctor for lots of reasons.

In March and April, patients were asked to postpone appointments that were not urgent. According to a white paper published by ‘Epic Health Research Network’ cancer screenings for cervix, colon, and breast cancer decreased between 86% – 94% in March, 2020. Care for heart attacks, organ transplants, high blood pressure and diabetes fell in March and remain significantly lower compared to the same time in 2019. “There is a 20% decrease in the number of interactions between patients and their oncologists during the COVID-19 pandemic,” Dr. Goldstein told his listeners. “Anytime a screening is delayed, it means that detection and early treatment are too, plus important therapy on advanced cancer are not administered.

Some Need To Be Seen

Many physicians, like Dr. Goldstein, ramped up their telemedicine capabilities in March and see patients that way. But there are still times when a patient needs to be seen. Instances where patients have symptoms that include shortness of breath is one. This symptom could signal heart failure, asthma, pneumonia or even the Covid-19 virus. A diagnosis like that cannot be done over the phone. “Patients and their families should err on the side of caution, contact their doctor and allow their physician the opportunity to make the right decision for the best treatment,” Dr. Goldstein said.

What Concerned Patients Can Ask

For those who believe or are told they must get in to see a doctor, and there is time available in a non-emergency, Dr. Goldstein has some potential questions to pose.

  • Does everyone on staff and patients wear masks?
  • Are the number of persons allowed in the office limited?
  • Has everyone on staff been tested for COVID-19?
  • Are cleaning protocols sufficient to manage waiting rooms, offices, and labs?
  • Has the patient taken responsibility for social distancing, hand washing and mask wearing themselves?

According to Dr. Goldstein, “we have a responsibility to our patients to provide the most appropriate and effective care possible while at the same time keeping potential exposure to the Coronavirus/Covid-19 virus to a minimum.”

About Houston Healthcare Initiative And Dr. Steven Goldstein

Dr. Steven Goldstein is a Houston based neurologist. He founded the Houston Healthcare Initiative and is an advocate for common sense solutions to the healthcare crisis that confronts the citizens and residents of the United States of America.

Job Losses Equal Employer Funded Health Insurance Loss

Closed for Coronavirus

Here Are Some Resources

Even with fewer jobs lost in May than anticipated Americans now experience an unemployment rate of 13.3% or 21 million people out of work due to the coronavirus/covid-19 pandemic. On top of lost income, loss of employer provided health insurance makes the cost even higher for those who through no fault of their own find themselves in a very challenging situation. On his podcast this week, Dr. Steven Goldstein describes how job losses equal employer funded health insurance loss and some available and often free resources for those who need health insurance. To listen to the podcast go to: Soundcloud, iHeart, Spotify, or iTunes. Or click here to listen:

 

Double Loss; Job and Health Insurance

Most Americans rely on their employers to provide health insurance for them and their families and when those jobs disappear so does the coverage. “It is extremely important that people get some type of coverage when they have lost their health insurance,” Dr. Goldstein told his listeners. “The available things to look into are COBRA, spouse insurance, faith-based cooperatives, enrollment on the insurance exchange (Obama Care), Medicaid and CHIP.”

COBRA Coverage

COBRA allows employees (and their families) who would otherwise lose their group health coverage due to certain life events to continue their same group health coverage. The former employee generally pays the full monthly rate and not the discounted one for their health insurance. Under COBRA, group health plans must also provide covered employees and their families with certain notices explaining their COBRA rights. The revised model notices provide additional information to address COBRA’s interaction with Medicare. The model notices explain that there may be advantages to enrolling in Medicare before, or instead of, electing COBRA.

State Insurance Exchange

While typically only available during certain months of the year, the state insurance exchange can open for those who experience a ‘life changing’ event. One such event is the loss of a job and employer sponsored health insurance. “You can shop for health plans through your state’s insurance marketplace,” Dr. Goldstein said. “But don’t wait around, there are 30 to 60 days to sign up after a qualifying life event before the end of that special enrollment period.”

Spouse Insurance

In households where a spouse’ employer offers health insurance; those benefits may be available. “It is easy enough to find out if a spouse’s job offers health insurance and sign on for that,” Dr. Goldstein said.

Faith Based Health Cooperatives

Faith based plans most often share expenses among members. Each member pays a monthly premium. When one of the members becomes ill or needs treatment for an injury, his or her contributions cover the expenses, in conjunction with the collective input of fellow members. “As such, the premiums are lower in comparison to those of traditional health care,” Dr. Goldstein said. “These operate with exemptions to the mandates of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obama Care.”

Medicare

Eligibility for Medicare is based on income and the size of family. Medicaid provides health coverage for some low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities in all fifty states.  In some states the program covers all low-income adults below a certain income level. “But do not assume that you do or do not qualify,” said Dr. Goldstein. “There are online resources available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services along with state references to help guide you.”

CHIP

CHIP stands for ‘Children’s Health Insurance Program.’ CHIP offers low-cost health coverage for children from birth through age 18. CHIP is designed for families who earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid but cannot afford to buy private health coverage. This coverage comes through the Medicaid program, which is why they are frequently seen together.

Income Qualification for Medicare

A family of four with an income of $25,750.00 at the poverty level and eligible for Medicaid or CHIP coverage. For an individual the amount was $12,490.00. The amount goes up by $4,420.00 for each additional family member. “The guidelines change every year,” Goldstein said.

The Good News

There are plenty of alternatives available to individuals and families that can be used short or for the longer term that are not all based on a job with insurance. People under age 26, may even be able to join their parents’ employer-based plan. “There are places to go and affordable resources available,” Dr. Goldstein concluded. “Any type of healthcare insurance or coverage will help protect your finances later.”

About Houston Healthcare Initiative And Dr. Steven Goldstein

Dr. Steven Goldstein is a Houston based neurologist. He founded the Houston Healthcare Initiative and is an advocate for common sense solutions to the healthcare crisis that confronts the citizens and residents of the United States of America.

 

How Will Healthcare Change After Coronavirus Covid-19

Rapid deployment to battle epidemics is key to winning.

How Will Healthcare Change After Coronavirus Covid-19

Doctors, hospitals, state and federal government agencies along with drug and insurance companies have all made concessions to the public during the time of the Coronavirus Covid-19 pandemic. This emergency affects every American so it stands to reason that what follows will too. But will common sense, red tape cutting, sensible changes that benefit patients remain, or be disposed of like so much medical waste? And what about preparations for future outbreaks? Houston based neurologist Dr. Steven Goldstein of the Houston Healthcare Initiative shares his views on this topic with his podcast audience. The podcast is available on iTunes, Soundcloud, Libsyn, and on www.houstonhealthcareinitiative.org.

Telemedicine

While remote access to doctors via Internet based communications is nothing new, it was never widely used until the outbreak of the Coronavirus/Covid-19 pandemic. But will patients continue to use this convenience? “It depends on what insurance companies will cover as well as what the regulations are from the state board of medical examiners,” Dr. Goldstein told his listeners. “There are plenty of good reasons to maintain this capability. Remote locations, lack of transportation resources and the reality that sick people are not keen to go to a clinic or doctor’s office whether they have the flu, a stomachache or even the Coronavirus should all help persuade the insurance industry to maintain payments for remote appointments.”

Lessons from the Pandemic – Rapid Strike Force

The speed that a viral outbreak is met with can prevent wider infection. Borrowing from an analogy coined by Bill Gates, Dr. Goldstein compared treatment to fighting a war.  “We need a standing army to spring into action when a virus is first found and ready to travel anywhere in the world to go to work,” he said.

LTC-Kryder-E-Van-Buskirk-Commander-of-the-8076th-MASH-in-Kunu-Ri-Korea-November-27
A medical rapid strike force to battle disease is one of the lessons the healthcare industry and government should apply after the Coronavirus/Covid-19 pandemic. LTC Kryder E. Van Buskirk, Commander of the 8076th MASH in Kunu- Ri, Korea, November 27, 1950. U.S. Army photograph 8A/FEC-50-22795 by CPL Fred A. Rice reprinted with permission.

Dr. Goldstein envisions teams of doctors, nurses, epidemiologists, virologists, and other medical professionals who can very quickly construct field hospitals on the site of the outbreak, isolate and treat the sick people and find treatments for them. “This would be like a ‘Mobile Army Surgical Hospital’ or MASH unit; fully equipped, staffed and right at the front line. The enemy is disease and must be fought aggressively.”

No Excuses

Goldstein thinks that the federal government must put a greater emphasis on public health and do more to keep people from getting sick. “This is not the first epidemic we’ve faced in recent years just the most recent,” Dr. Goldstein said. He described the many recent health crises the world has faced and faces including HIV/AIDS, Ebola, Zika, MERS and lately the Coronavirus/Covid-19 outbreak. “There will be no excuse for any lack of preparedness when this happens again, and we know it will happen again.”

About Dr. Steven Goldstein

The goal of Dr. Steven Goldstein and the Houston Healthcare Initiative is to be a catalyst for change in the way Americans receive and pay for medical treatment. To cause change his web site is an aggregator of information, tools, and targets for the reform of the healthcare industry with an emphasis on free market innovation and personal responsibility.